Daniel Box
By Daniel Box

If you want to really lower your scores, then having a razor sharp short game is vital to get you out of trouble when you do happen to stray offline. Although wedges don't often receive the aggressive marketing and emphasis that irons and drivers do, they are just as important for golfers. Being able to get up and down from a tricky situation can really keep your round going, and help you to limit any damage.

Here at Golfalot we've had a look back at all of our wedge reviews from 2018 and picked out the five best models that we tried, so if your short game is in need of some TLC then you're in the right place.

In no particular order:

Cleveland RTX 4 Wedge

Cleveland RTX 4 Wedge

What it's all about... The Cleveland RTX 4 wedge is the latest in their tour wedge dynasty that stretches back over 30 years. It seeks to strengthen their appeal to better players with a smaller profile and tour-style looks.

The tech... Along with the smaller profile, there is also less offset and a straighter leading edge, all of which points towards a blade wedge for players who want maximum feel and versatility. Tighter tolerances, more precise laser milling and even more aggressive face milling aim to deliver superior spin to the previous RTX-3 model.

What we say... The Cleveland RTX 4 is an extremely comprehensive range that covers 18 different loft and bounce combinations from 46° to 64° so there should be something in there for everyone. The feel from the head is once again very good and the tour profile and offset moves it down the handicap range a little.

Read the full review here

Bettinardi H2 303 SS Wedge

Bettinardi H2 303 SS Wedge

What it's all about... Bettinardi are renowned for their putters that are milled from a single block of forged steel and their wedge for 2018 continues this fine tradition.

The tech... In the H2 303 SS wedge, the milling process removes material quicker to give a rougher surface. Bettinardi then adds its patented honeycomb face milling pattern between the grooves to give as much grip as possible.

There are six lofts from 50° to 60° with one bounce per loft and a simple C-grind sole with relief in the toe and heel.

What we say... Overall the Bettinardi H2 303 SS wedge is a very playable, beautiful looking wedge that will suit better players and is competitively priced too.

Read the full review here

Callaway Mack Daddy 4 Wedge

Callaway Mack Daddy 4 Wedge

What it's all about... The Callaway Mack Daddy 4 builds on the success of the MD3 wedge with a new type of groove pattern and an additional grind.

The tech... On the face, Callaway has introduced ‘Groove-in-Groove technology’, where micro grooves between the full grooves have been added onto the face to create a rougher surface and therefore provide extra grip. Callaway says this effectively increases the number of grooves from 16 to 84.

What we say... Overall the Mack Daddy 4 is another classic wedge from the hands of the master, Roger Cleveland, and with the addition of the new grooves you get more spin and control.

Read the full review here

Titleist Vokey SM7 Wedge

Titleist Vokey SM7 Wedge

What it's all about... Last time around the Vokey SM6 was designed around positioning the Centre of Gravity (CG) more centrally so that you would have better feel and consistency. Now with the Vokey SM7, Titleist are taking this to the next level with a further refinement of the heads.

The tech... The SM7 wedges seek to find the right balance with their weight placement in the head, with lower lofts concentrating weight more in the sole and the higher lofts aiming to move it up towards the toe in order to position the CG right behind the impact point.

In the Vokey SM7 in the higher and lower lofts, the hosel lengths are shorter than their equivalents in the SM6 and vary according to the loft. The soles are a little wider on SM7 compared to SM6, presumably to accommodate the weight coming down from the hosel.

What we say... Compared to SM6, the SM7 offers another development on the CG placement design and this changes the way the club sat and how it feels, even though the swing weight and actual weight is the same as before.

Read the full review here

Ping Glide Forged Wedge

Ping Glide Forged Wedge

What it's all about... The Glide Forged wedge is a standalone product of the Glide wedge family. Unlike the previous addition, the Glide 2.0 wedge, the Glide Forged is a blade design, which is a first for Ping.

The tech... The Glide 2.0 is a cavity back design with a wider sole than the sleek Glide Forged, which is much narrower and that gives it a bit more versatility. The trailing edge is much sharper than before and there is a little bit of heel relief so you can open the face up a little if you want.

Under the Hydropearl finish in the toe is a 13g high density tungsten weight to counterbalance the weight of the hosel and improve the MOI of the head.

What we say... The Glide Forged wedge is very versatile and what every single figure player could wish for in a blade wedge. The feel is excellent and the head size is about right for this level of wedge, and a little smaller than the Glide 2.0.

Read the full review here

Summary

They're our five picks, and there should be something for everyone in there with dozens of different loft, grind and bounce combinations on offer. If all of this has given you a headache, check out our Wedge Buying Guide or Guide to Bounce here for extra information to make that all-important decision a bit easier.

Do you use one of these wedges? Is there a wedge in this list that you want to try out? Let us know your thoughts below.

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